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Body Proportions

The first and most important factor to consider is your overall body size. Find your assets and build on them. A general rule of thumb for body size is “small with small and big with tall”. If you are small in stature but have large bones, you must take that into account when buying specific pieces such as necklaces and bracelets. The reverse holds true for large women who are small boned.

  • Petite: small women must accept their size, be proud of it and not try to appear to be something they are not: taller.
    Thin use necklaces and bracelets to emphasize bones, i.e. collar length necklaces, narrow bangle bracelets, sweeping up earrings
    Average

    select earrings that sweep up, angles that draw attention upwardscollar necklace with v-shapes;

    longer necklaces that fall below the breast but above the waist to elongate the figure

    avoid drop/dangle earrings
    Full-figured sharp geometric shapes provide contrast, more lines, and anglesselect medium-sized pieces and avoid necklaces and bracelets that fit close to the skin avoid round shapes altogether, especially button/round earringsavoid tiny jewelry
  • Average: average height women have a wider range of jewelry choices. Geometric shapes such as triangles, squares and ovals create excitement.
    Thin wear wide bracelets
    Average wear medium bracelets and necklaces of any length
    Full-figured wear just one or two necklacesselect medium-sized jewelry avoid necklaces which rest on the breastline
  • Tall: the tall woman has the widest range of choices. Select the pieces that complement your height.
    Thin wear choker necklaces which break the lines of the neck and de-emphasize height;wear uniform necklaces
    Average can wear any earring except tiny buttons long pendant and dangling ones are especially flattering tiny button earrings
    Full-figured wear numerous thin or a couple of thick braceletsnecklaces should be loose and tapering and of medium size avoid oversized beads

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