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Cornbury Society Constitution

The Cornbury Society Constitution

amended April 2009

Preamble

The Cornbury Society was started in July of 1989 by a small group of heterosexual crossdressers to provide a safe environment for the development of feminine appearance in conventional attire, as well as encouraging a sense of confidence and well-being. The name came from Lord Cornbury, Governor of New York and New Jersey 1701 - 1708 for the British. The father of many children, Cornbury often dressed as a woman, once opened the government assembly "fully" representing Queen Anne, had a portrait painted in a low cut gown and even attended his wife's funeral dressed as a widow in mourning.

Purpose

The Cornbury Society is intended to be a social and support group for all transgender people regardless of sex, race, religion, sexual orientation or the nature or degree of their transgenderness. Although it strives to be inclusive of all transgender people, the Society is a group for exploring one's transgender nature, not one's sexual orientation. The intent is to be supportive and inclusive rather than discriminatory and divisive.

Objectives

The objectives of the Cornbury Society are:

  1. To provide mutual help for all transgender people:
    1. In reducing emotional stress and guilt.
    2. In gaining the understanding of their associates and loved ones.
    3. To provide mutual help amongst associates of transgender people.
    4. In improving their appearance and manner in their chosen gender;
    5. In making contact with persons sharing their interest in transgenderness
  2. To have available for others, information on transgenderness.

Bylaws

  1. The affairs of the Cornbury Society shall be conducted according to the Society's Bylaws.

Amendment

  1. The articles in this constitution may be amended at the Annual General Meeting or at a special business meeting of the membership, sixty days notice of such motion of amendment and its purpose, having been given to all members of the Society.
  2. No amendment, addition or deletion shall be deemed carried unless it has received the approval of two-thirds of the members present.

One man's Mede is another man's Persian.
-- George M. Cohan



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